2017 Hyundai Ioniq review with video


The basics:

Prices are still to be announced but the expected price range for the hybrid Ioniq is: $24,000-$33,000
The expected price range for the fully electric Ioniq is: $35,000-$42,000
Average fuel economy during our road test: 5.1 L/100 kms (46 US MPG)
Competition: Chevrolet Volt, Toyota Prius, Toyota Prius V, etc.

Hyundai is coming out swinging with the brand new Ioniq. It’s the first eco-minded vehicle ever to offer three choices of power plant: a conventional hybrid (what we tested for the week), a plug-in hybrid that offers just over 40 kms of purely electric range, and a fully electric vehicle that will give you 200 kms of range. Now, this car is so new that it’s not even available in showrooms yet. Pricing is also not totally locked down but you can see some of the expected ranges above. The hybrid and fully electric models should be in showrooms later this spring and the plug-in hybrid is expected in the late fall or early winter. But based on our week of driving the hybrid, the grand daddy of this segment, the Toyota Prius, has a bit of a target on its back. The drive feel is spirited, the interior looks great and the trunk space is a bit more usable. For all the details, take a look at our full video review above and then read our report card below.

Pros:

– Hyundai has opted for a six speed dual clutch automatic transmission instead of the dull continuously variable transmissions we see in so many eco-centric cars. The result is a car that feels far more conventional and surprisingly zippy
– Especially when you pop it over into sport mode which makes this car downright fun. Fuel economy will suffer somewhat but after a day of driving in the city strictly in sport mode, we still saw a very impressive average of 5.6 L/100 kms
– The Ioniq also has a far better interior than the Prius, which feels scatterbrained and cheap. The Ionic has a good balance between touch screen controls and physical buttons and, in general, it just feels far more cohesive and considered
– The batteries for the hybrid system are stored under the second row like the Prius which mean lots of extra space in the trunk. And despite the fact that this is a liftback with a seriously sloped back window, there was still enough headroom in there to fit our 80 lb dog – a very pleasant surprise

Cons:
– We averaged 4.6 L/100 kms over a week of testing the Prius – the Ioniq didn’t quite get there with 5.1 L/100 kms (which doesn’t sound like much but that’s actually 10% difference). So if economy is all that matters to you, the Prius wins out – but for a balance between a more zippy drive and economy, the Ioniq is tough to beat
– Cabin noise at highway speed is quite bad. We hit 66 decibels at 100 kms/h
– The split rear split window makes rearward visibility quite difficult and is a poor design choice taken directly from the Prius that has been doing the same thing for years
– Leg room in the second row is very respectable but headroom for taller adults is tight
– The driver’s seat automatically slides back when the ignition is turned off. This is bad for rear passengers who get pinned in by the sliding seat
– When you put the second row down to create more storage space, the floor is not flat – which makes it less usable

Family Wheels report card:

Family Wheels driver comfort score: 4/5
Family Wheels interior layout score: 4/5
Family Wheels infotainment system score: 4/5
Family Wheels interior noise score: 2.5/5 (66 dB at 100 kms/h)
Family Wheels performance score: 4/5
Family Wheels rear passenger score: 3.5/5
Family Wheels trunk score: 4/5
Family Wheels fuel economy score: 5/5
Family Wheels build quality score: 3.5/5
Family Wheels value score: 4/5

Family Wheels overall score: 38.5/50= 77%

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